Return Home

Blog

Order Up

Jeremy’s photographs of the Waggoner Ranch document many iconic aspects of the ranch.  Taken a year before the ranch sold to Stan Kroenke, they capture the ranch right before its historic change of hands, preserving a way of life for future generations. Some things have changed on the Waggoner since then, including the closing of the Waggoner Ranch cook shack. As time passes, this photographic history of the ranch becomes increasingly precious.

Debbie’s cooking philosophy was simple: “Lots of calories,” she laughs. None of it goes to waste. The cowboys filled their plates from the cafeteria-style line up of from-scratch comfort food. When the cook shack was open, Debbie made breakfast and lunch six days a week for the twenty-six cowboys.

You can see more photos of the Waggoner Ranch cook shack here, and what it looked like in the 1980s here.

Jeremy Enlow of Steel Shutter Photography photographed the cow camp at the Waggoner Ranch

It takes a lot of coffee to be a cowboy.

Debbie’s cooking was always mouthwateringly delicious and filling.

Weldon Hawley, right, is always the last to eat and the first to head to work.

Order now!

These Boots Were Made for Working

Working on the largest ranch under one fence in the United States is a strenuous job. To get it done, the cowboys rely on well made ropes, saddles, and boots. The cost of outfitting a cowboy adds up quickly. “A cowboy needs a saddle, boots, hat, leggings, spurs to start with,” says Bobby Daniel. “Everything’s really high now. Saddles are really high.” Bobby rode for the Waggoner for 51 years before retiring in 2016.

The cowboys choose their boots with great care. “We wear handmade boots,” says Ricky Rios. “Handmade boots last three or four years. Store-bought only last about a year.” Master Bootmaker Mike Vaughn crafted some of the boots pictured in Cowboys of the Waggoner Ranch. You can read more about Mike here in our Meet the Makers blog series.

Jeremy Enlow photographed the Waggoner Ranch cowboys for his first book. Cowboys of the Waggoner Ranch is made in Texas.

 

Cowboys of the Waggoner Ranch is made in Texas, by Texans.

 

Jeremy Enlow's inaugural book is the recipient of 6 awards

These boots aren’t just well made and good looking. They’re designed to stand up to the hard work and Texas dirt the cowboys see every day. Day after day, these boots walk one of the largest ranches in the United States. Buy Cowboys of the Waggoner Ranch today to see more Waggoner cowboy life up close.

Order now!

Everyday Grit

“I was shocked a ranch this size still existed with so many Cowboys still practicing cowboying the way it was done 100 years ago, with just their ropes and horses.  The land on the Waggoner is beautiful, but it’s the Cowboys on the ranch that make it a special place.” -Jeremy Enlow

The Waggoner Ranch cowboys work hard to keep the ranch’s cattle camp operations going. A work week is 5 and a half days long, averaging 10 hours per day.  “When I started thirty years ago, we had two vehicles,” says Weldon Hawley. “We rode in the camper in the back of the wagon boss’ truck. The chuck wagon was out (instead of cowboys driving in to eat at the cook shack). We have radios and cell phones and the helicopter. Everything else is about the same as it always has been.”

Cowboying this way is a hard, demanding way of life that requires a lot of grit. As predictable as their work is, any number of things – the weather, a startled horse, a debilitating accident, disease taking hold of the herd – can change everything in a moment. Cowboys are accustomed to uncertainty. They face each new day as it comes, making the best of it.

These are the cowboys of the Waggoner Ranch.

Jeremy Enlow of Steel Shutter photography documented the Waggoner Ranch in 2015

Waggoner Ranch near Vernon, TX photographed by Dallas advertising photographer Jeremy Enlow

Jeremy Enlow is a Dallas / Fort Worth advertising and media photographer

Order now!

Cowgirl of the Waggoner Ranch

In Cowboys of the Waggoner Ranchone cowgirl stands out. Cassidy “Butch” Chambliss lends a hand on the ranch during the summer. Well acquainted with the work at hand, she helps show the younger kids the ropes, too. The initiative modeled by the Waggoner cowboys is demonstrated in the way she works. Nobody has to tell her to hurry up or pay attention, the Waggoner work ethic having been instilled the previous summer. Not intimidated by the heat or the dust or the cattle, Butch hasn’t decided whether she wants to be a veterinarian or a cowgirl.

A Waggoner Ranch veteran, Butch Chambliss loves riding horses

Eleven-year-old Cassidy works with the cowboys during summer vacation. “Everybody calls me Butch,” she says. “I’ve been riding since I was two years old.” When Jeremy visited the ranch, she was happy to be riding her favorite horse, Romeo. “He likes to go fast!” she says with a grin.

You can see Cassidy riding Romeo in photos from Jeremy’s archives here.

Order now!

Merry Christmas, Y’all

‘Twas the week of Christmas, and all around the ranch all the cowboys were working the DDD brand. “The only weather we don’t work in is rain and lightning and when it’s too hot for the stock,” says ranch manager Weldon Hawley. Cowboys work ten hours a day, five and a half days a week. “There’s always enough cowboys around for an emergency, like fighting a grassfire or something,” says Jimbo Glover. “Somebody asked me, ‘What do you want to be when you get big?’ and I said, ‘I ain’t going to be a fireman, I’ll tell you.’”

 

Cowboys practice old-fashioned virtues. “Integrity is what the world’s missing now,” Weldon Hawley says. “There’s a lot of pride in their work, a bunch more so than anywhere else.”

Arriving at the pasture where they’ll work, the cowboys unload their horses and mount up in the faint glow of the moon and their vehicles’ lights.

“To do this, you just have to love it,” says Weldon Hawley. And the Waggoner cowboys do love their work; you can see it in every face as they ride out into the pasture. They are a living image of the American West. And this is an opportunity to see who they really are. These are the cowboys of the Waggoner Ranch.

 

Whether you’re reading from the city or the ranch, we hope you have a very merry Christmas. Don’t have a copy of Cowboys of the Waggoner Ranch yet? There’s still time to get yours in time for Christmas. Just choose priority shipping by December 21st and it will get to you in time for the holiday!

Order by Dec. 21 for Christmas delivery!

Holiday Shipping

Help Santa out, Texas style. Cowboys of the Waggoner Ranch is made in Texas, by Texans, about Texans. With our new Priority shipping option, there’s plenty of time to order the book for everyone on your Christmas list.

Shipping Deadlines

In order to receive your book by Christmas, please order by the dates below

  • FREE SHIPPING | Order by December 15th
  • PRIORITY SHIPPING | Order by December 21st

Order Now!

The Story as Old as Texas

“The book shows we’re still surviving, doing things like they did 100 years ago, the cowboy way.” –  Waggoner Ranch Manager Weldon Hawley quoted in Western Horseman, (March 2016).  Mr. Hawley has worked at the Waggoner since 1976. 

In 1849, Dan Waggoner began the ranch with 6 horses, 242 longhorns, and a bit of land in Wise County. Over time, the ranch grew and moved out towards Wichita Falls. It is now the largest ranch under one fence in the United States, spanning 6 counties. Cowboys of the Waggoner Ranch is proud to be a GO TEXAN product

Jeremy Enlow visited the Waggoner in 2015 to document the 26 cowboys working the ranch. The result is his inaugural book, Cowboys of the Waggoner Ranch. Printed in North Texas, we’re proud that Cowboys of the Waggoner Ranch is a GO TEXAN product.

 

 

Made in Texas, by Texans

This Christmas, GO TEXAN and give everyone on your list a gift made in Texas, by Texans, about Texans. The largest ranch under one fence in the United States, the Waggoner Ranch is nearly as old as Texas. Texas native Jeremy Enlow spent five months photographing the 26 working cowboys who live there. The result is the award-winning Cowboys of the Waggoner Ranch, a 140 page full color coffee table book printed right here in North Texas.  

GO TEXAN this Christmas when you order Cowboys of the Waggoner Ranch

“Printing bids were much cheaper in Asia, but for this book not only did I want it to be printed in the United States but specifically in Texas,” says Jeremy Enlow. “It is important to me to know the working conditions are safe and people are being treated fairly.  Texans, myself included, are proud of their state.  I consider it a great achievement that this book was 100% made by Texans in Texas.

Texan from start to finish

Jeremy along with John Davidson (editor), Julie Enlow (producer), Jan Batts (copy), Yvette Bowling (design), Julie Hatch (Public Relations/Media) and Hunter Mills (Public Relations/Social Media) are all native Texans. Cowboys of the Waggoner Ranch is proud to be a GO TEXAN product. A portion of the proceeds from the sale of this book benefits The Waggoner Ranch Cowboys Fund, giving back to some of Texas’ greatest living legends. 

“The book shows we’re still surviving, doing things like they did 100 years ago, the cowboy way.” –  Waggoner Ranch Manager Weldon Hawley quoted in Western Horseman, (March 2016).  Mr. Hawley has worked at the Waggoner since 1976.

Buy the book now and get FREE shipping in the United States!

Order Now!

We Won a 2016 Equus Film Festival Winnie!

Last week, Cowboys of the Waggoner Ranch was honored to attend the Equus Film Festival in New York City. The festival’s mission is to “be the home to the horse storytellers of the world,” and it was great to be a part of that mission. Jeremy Enlow signed books for the festival’s pop up gallery and spoke at a panel with other authors.

Cowboys of the Waggoner Ranch won the 2016 Equus Film Festival Winnie in the Equine Photography Collection category.

 

Equus Festival Winnie Award

This is the sixth award Cowboys of the Waggoner Ranch has received this year. Thank you to everyone who has supported and shared the book. It’s an honor to tell the story of these cowboys and the Waggoner Ranch. By supporting Cowboys of the Waggoner Ranch, you’re supporting local Texas businesses and cowboys, with every purchase benefitting The Waggoner Ranch Cowboys Fund.

Love cowboys and horses? Order Cowboys of the Waggoner Ranch today and enjoy FREE shipping in the United States. 

Order Now!

We’re Popping into Ft. Worth for the Holidays

Hey there, Fort Worth! Cowboys of the Waggoner Ranch is popping up in Sundance Square for the holidays. The Jeremy Enlow Fine Art Photography Pop Up Gallery will be open daily from November 25 – December 24. Come on out to get your signed copy of the award-winning book right here in Fort Worth.

The 4,200 square foot gallery will feature fine art prints from Jeremy’s Waggoner RanchCuba 2016, and via collections.

Jeremy Enlow Fine Art Photography Pop Up Gallery

 

Gallery Hours

Monday – Thursday | 11 am – 7 pm
Friday – Saturday | 11 am – 9 pm
Sunday | 12 pm – 6 pm

Located at Third and Houston

 

Follow Jeremy on Instagram @jeremyenlow for more pop up gallery updates! 

 

 

 

Never Before Seen Photographs of Waggoner Ranch Vol. 3

Good morning!

To celebrate Equus International Film Festival this week, we’re sharing 10 more previously unpublished photographs from Jeremy’s archives. If you enjoy seeing new photos of the ranch, follow us on Facebook and Twitter where we share new images every week. The photographs in Cowboys of the Waggoner Ranch and Jeremy’s archives show a side of cowboy life that’s not often seen, as the reviewer below says:

“Being a life long Texan (and you’ll understand this if you’re one too), I have seen more than my fair share of “The Cowboy Life” portrayed in the worst way by some slick New York or Los Angeles artist/producer/photographer/journalist… In my travels, it never fails, that I am presented with some misconceived and ill informed lore of how Texas, Cowboys, and country life if portrayed elsewhere. So when I heard about this book – I was naturally skeptical, and fully expected some mockery and over zealous portrayal of country bumpkins, akin to another horrible Woody Harrelson and Kiefer Sutherland performance.. I was horribly, horribly WRONG.”  -Amazon book review, (May 7, 2016)

We love this review of the book and are honored to show Texas cowboys in a way that honors them as the living legends they are.

 

Order Now!